Surfing Paradise : Padang Padang, Bali

//Surfing Paradise : Padang Padang, Bali

Surfing Paradise : Padang Padang, Bali

You know that idealistic image of the perfect surf break? That rare combination of warm, clear blue water, of yellow sandy beaches, and of clean, barrelling waves. Padang Padang Beach and its surrounding areas bring that vision to life.

The Bukit Peninsula juts out of the south side of the popular tourist island of Bali, in Indonesia, and Padang Padang is the centre of what is a playground for surfers.

Where to Stay

The region is full of high quality, cheap accomodation. If you’re after something simple but comfortable, you’re looking at $15-20 USD. There are also plenty of more luxurious options for those that way inclined, particularly in Padang Padang, which are just a stones throw away from the break.

If you’re after a mix of the two, try the Bingin Inn. The rooms here are basic enough, but they all face an outdoor section complete with a pool, lounge chairs, and plenty of green jungle. An accompanying restaurant also serves simple meals at a cheap price. You’ll need a motorbike to get to any surf, but they’re super cheap and the drive is no more than a couple of minutes.

How to Get There

Fly into Denpasar International Airport. This area can be pretty stifling, but you’ll quickly be confronted by an abundance of cab drivers looking to get you out of there. Padang Padang is about a 45 minute drive from Denpasar, and you’ll get there relatively cheap. Try to stick with BlueBird taxis – they offer solid rates, and you’re unlikely to encounter any funny business with them.

The Region

Padang Padang is on the west side of the Bukit Peninsula. Along with the neighbouring towns, it is truly one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited. Most of the land on the west coast of this peninsula sits significantly higher than the ocean, meaning you are treated to some spectacular views wherever you go. Bingin and Uluwatu, in particular, are 5 minutes drive from Padang Padang in either direction, and provide some of the most breathtaking views you are ever likely to see.

The Surf

The break off Padang Padang beach itself, when pumping, is home to a world class left-hander. As with most of the waves around here, it is a reef break, and its best is good enough to warrant Ripcurl holding a tournament there each year. Realistically though, the type of swell which this tournament yearns for only comes along every few weeks at best, which is fortunate for those of us who don’t feel comfortable dropping into 10 foot barrels over a sharp reef.

What you can expect is remarkable consistency, with sets often coming through at around head height. There is a fun, albeit short, right, and a much longer left. Boards of all shapes and sizes can be rented out from the beach, which means a diverse crowd. The crowd itself can be overwhelming, with upwards of 30 or 40 people filling the line-up within a relatively confined area.

You’ll soon realize, though, that a vast majority of these people have simply hired out a board from the beach with minimal to no experience surfing, and will mostly just sit out there admiring the sea. This is a worthy exercise in itself, with turtles regularly popping their head out of the clear blue water to provide entertainment for the less confident surfers.

You don’t need to take much to surf here. A pair of boardies or a bikini is more than enough in these tropical waters. If you don’t have your board with you, there are boards both long and short available to hire on the beach.

Kilometres of coast on either side of Padang Padang house many more world class reef breaks. Uluwatu, to the south-west, tends to break significantly bigger, and masses of people sit up at Single Fin Bar overlooking some very talented surfers strut their stuff here. In the other direction, Bingin is home to a more beginner friendly left, while Dreamland is one of few beach breaks in the area.

Who surfs there?

Everyone. Hoards of seasoned surfers go there hunting some world class waves, while plenty of non-surfers decide to try their hand at it while in paradise. This creates for an interesting dynamic in the water, with learners taking lessons alongside some very talented surfers. Look out for the local surf teachers to sneak in a wave or two while their student isn’t paying attention – they are seriously good and know the wave like the back of their hand.

If you’re looking to get away from the masses, particularly the inexperienced ones, head a little closer to Uluwatu. The bigger size means it’s generally reserved for more seasoned surfers.

Extra-curricular activities

Those looking to incorporate a little bit of culture into their surf trip would do well to visit the Uluwatu Temple. One of six ‘spiritual pillars’ in Bali, the temple is perched magnificently on the edge of a cliff, right alongside the ocean. The views alone are enough to warrant a visit, while the mischievous monkeys provide an added element of entertainment.

There are some incredible places to eat – though I say this much more because of the views than the food itself. Head to Bingin, and find the steps which head down to the beach. Along the way, there are plenty of little ‘warungs’ (family owned restaurants) with extraordinary views. From their high vantage point, you can see the break at Bingin, look across to Padang Padang, and past that, all the way to Uluwatu. With the waves all lining up perfectly from this angle, and the reef completely visible beneath the crystal clear water, this is truly a sight to behold.

Single Fin is a bar/restaurant in Uluwatu which hosts the best party in Bali on a Sunday night. The bar itself is perched on the cliffs of Uluwatu, so get there before sunset to watch the last of the surfers getting some serious waves. The prices are slightly above the region’s average, but the location and atmosphere make it well and truly worth it.

This area is truly a paradise, even before you take the surf into consideration. The world class waves, combined with the landscape, make this peninsula a must visit.

You know that idealistic image of the perfect surf break? That rare combination of warm, clear blue water, of yellow sandy beaches, and of clean, barrelling waves. Padang Padang Beach and its surrounding areas bring that vision to life.

The Bukit Peninsula juts out of the south side of the popular tourist island of Bali, in Indonesia, and Padang Padang is the centre of what is a playground for surfers.

Where to Stay

The region is full of high quality, cheap accomodation. If you’re after something simple but comfortable, you’re looking at $15-20 USD. There are also plenty of more luxurious options for those that way inclined, particularly in Padang Padang, which are just a stones throw away from the break.

If you’re after a mix of the two, try the Bingin Inn. The rooms here are basic enough, but they all face an outdoor section complete with a pool, lounge chairs, and plenty of green jungle. An accompanying restaurant also serves simple meals at a cheap price. You’ll need a motorbike to get to any surf, but they’re super cheap and the drive is no more than a couple of minutes.

How to Get There

Fly into Denpasar International Airport. This area can be pretty stifling, but you’ll quickly be confronted by an abundance of cab drivers looking to get you out of there. Padang Padang is about a 45 minute drive from Denpasar, and you’ll get there relatively cheap. Try to stick with BlueBird taxis – they offer solid rates, and you’re unlikely to encounter any funny business with them.

The Region

Padang Padang is on the west side of the Bukit Peninsula. Along with the neighbouring towns, it is truly one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited. Most of the land on the west coast of this peninsula sits significantly higher than the ocean, meaning you are treated to some spectacular views wherever you go. Bingin and Uluwatu, in particular, are 5 minutes drive from Padang Padang in either direction, and provide some of the most breathtaking views you are ever likely to see.

The Surf

The break off Padang Padang beach itself, when pumping, is home to a world class left-hander. As with most of the waves around here, it is a reef break, and its best is good enough to warrant Ripcurl holding a tournament there each year. Realistically though, the type of swell which this tournament yearns for only comes along every few weeks at best, which is fortunate for those of us who don’t feel comfortable dropping into 10 foot barrels over a sharp reef.

What you can expect is remarkable consistency, with sets often coming through at around head height. There is a fun, albeit short, right, and a much longer left. Boards of all shapes and sizes can be rented out from the beach, which means a diverse crowd. The crowd itself can be overwhelming, with upwards of 30 or 40 people filling the line-up within a relatively confined area.

You’ll soon realize, though, that a vast majority of these people have simply hired out a board from the beach with minimal to no experience surfing, and will mostly just sit out there admiring the sea. This is a worthy exercise in itself, with turtles regularly popping their head out of the clear blue water to provide entertainment for the less confident surfers.

You don’t need to take much to surf here. A pair of boardies or a bikini is more than enough in these tropical waters. If you don’t have your board with you, there are boards both long and short available to hire on the beach.

Kilometres of coast on either side of Padang Padang house many more world class reef breaks. Uluwatu, to the south-west, tends to break significantly bigger, and masses of people sit up at Single Fin Bar overlooking some very talented surfers strut their stuff here. In the other direction, Bingin is home to a more beginner friendly left, while Dreamland is one of few beach breaks in the area.

Who surfs there?

Everyone. Hoards of seasoned surfers go there hunting some world class waves, while plenty of non-surfers decide to try their hand at it while in paradise. This creates for an interesting dynamic in the water, with learners taking lessons alongside some very talented surfers. Look out for the local surf teachers to sneak in a wave or two while their student isn’t paying attention – they are seriously good and know the wave like the back of their hand.

If you’re looking to get away from the masses, particularly the inexperienced ones, head a little closer to Uluwatu. The bigger size means it’s generally reserved for more seasoned surfers.

Extra-curricular activities

Those looking to incorporate a little bit of culture into their surf trip would do well to visit the Uluwatu Temple. One of six ‘spiritual pillars’ in Bali, the temple is perched magnificently on the edge of a cliff, right alongside the ocean. The views alone are enough to warrant a visit, while the mischievous monkeys provide an added element of entertainment.

There are some incredible places to eat – though I say this much more because of the views than the food itself. Head to Bingin, and find the steps which head down to the beach. Along the way, there are plenty of little ‘warungs’ (family owned restaurants) with extraordinary views. From their high vantage point, you can see the break at Bingin, look across to Padang Padang, and past that, all the way to Uluwatu. With the waves all lining up perfectly from this angle, and the reef completely visible beneath the crystal clear water, this is truly a sight to behold.

Single Fin is a bar/restaurant in Uluwatu which hosts the best party in Bali on a Sunday night. The bar itself is perched on the cliffs of Uluwatu, so get there before sunset to watch the last of the surfers getting some serious waves. The prices are slightly above the region’s average, but the location and atmosphere make it well and truly worth it.

This area is truly a paradise, even before you take the surf into consideration. The world class waves, combined with the landscape, make this peninsula a must visit.

 

 

Leave A Comment